TALENT LAB

FRIDAY, APRIL 13 | 10:00 AM & 12:00 PM | VIFF VANCITY THEATRE
GRADES 8-12

Talent Lab provides an opportunity to introduce students to an entire universe of exciting, diverse, and ingenious storytelling from around the world. R2R’s programmer travels around the world in order to bring Vancouver audiences the best of the best. Our goal is to cultivate an understanding and appreciation of global cultures and perspectives. Join us for a feature length film, followed by a Q&A with the filmmaker, a discussant, or one of our programmers. A study guide is provided for each film.  

 

REGISTRATION

Contact education@r2rfestival.org to register your class. Bookings will be handled on a first-come first-served basis. We accept registrations from school groups, home learners and individual elementary school students with a guardian, and individual high school students with school and parental consent.

Talent Lab includes a feature film and a study guide for pre-registered school groups. 

 

PRICES

$5 Film (per student, with a group of 10 or more)

Please note: We encourage you to check your calendar for conflicts prior to registration. R2R requires a minimum of two weeks notice in order to cancel your registration and offer a full refund. This applies to all school groups.

>>Program subject to change<<

The Talk

Using a mix of hand drawn images, photographs, computer generated images as well as stop frame animated toys and props, the teenage memories of several individuals have been caringly recreated in order to best present the awkwardness of one of life’s strangest occurrences. The Talk has won numerous awards internationally, including; Hot Docs, AFI Docs, and Tribeca Film Festival.

Themes: sex, gender, memory, youth culture and experience

Advisory: frank discussions about sex, gender and sexuality

length: 
9min
screens: 
Fri, 04/13/2018 - 10:00
Fri, 04/13/2018 - 19:30

Princess Cyd

CANADIAN THEATRICAL PREMIERE

Critics have noted that writer/director Stephen Cone has crafted the most underrated film of the year, and R2R concurs! The Chicago-based director has also garnered comparisons to the late Jonathan Deme.

Sixteen-year-old Cyd’s estranged aunt Miranda agrees to host her in Chicago over the summer. Miranda lives the low key life of an accomplished author, and is tethered to the home she grew up in with her sister, Cyd's departed mother. Decidedly not a reader, Cyd is completely oblivious to her aunt’s success. Instead, she is tethered to her phone and interested in soccer. Despite not knowing much about one another, a comforting familial intimacy soon develops.

Genuinely interested in the ways of the adult world, Cyd provokes her aunt with probing curiosity about her mom and where she came from. With her new-found maternal bent, Miranda counters, offering patience and compassion to her questioning niece. As they challenge each other on everything from spirituality to sex, they are confronted by personal truths. Miranda begins to realize that over the years of solitude she’s unwittingly relegated her desires to the bottom shelf. Cyd discovers new experiences and learns that she is more open than she thought. Unlike most films centering young queer characters, Princess Cyd is written with all of the positivity, richness and complexity that gender and sexuality deserve. Frequently funny, subtle, and insightful, the vulnerability and revelatory essence of their relationship proudly exclaims that we should celebrate each other, and most importantly, honour what brings us joy. One’s truth is one’s truth, whatever it may be.

Recommended for ages 14+

Themes: family, gender identity, sexuality, mental health, literature and poetry, suicide, love

Content Advisory: Underage alcohol consumption at a gathering of family and friends, with the consent of a guardian; smoking marijuana; some sexually suggestive scenes; suggested physical violence toward a young person.

Classification: 14A

Note: This film screens as part of the  program for grades 8-12.

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PRECEDED BY: 

"The Talk" True Stories About the Birds & the Bees 
Alain Delannoy | Canada | 2016 | 9 mins

Using a mix of hand drawn images, photographs, computer generated images as well as stop frame animated toys and props, the teenage memories of several individuals have been caringly recreated in order to best present the awkwardness of one of life’s strangest occurrences. The Talk has won numerous awards internationally, including; Hot Docs, AFI Docs, and Tribeca Film Festival.

Themes: sex, gender, memory, youth culture and experience
Advisory: Frank discussions about sex, gender and sexuality.

Trailer

 

More photos of Princesss Cyd...

   

DIRECTOR'S BIO: 

Stephen Cone is a Southern-raised, Chicago-based filmmaker. His previous film, Henry Gamble’s Birthday Party, was selected as one of only 23 films to screen in the prestigious BAMcinemaFest at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, and was featured in the New York Times as a part of it’s “Anatomy of a Scene” series. The film also received the prestigious Chicago International Film Festival Silver Q Hugo Award, as well as rave reviews, and Time Out New York naming it “a coming out story for the ages.” Henry Gamble had its European Premiere at the BFI Flare Film Festival. Stephen’s prior film, the award-winning, critically-acclaimed The Wise Kids was raved about by the Chicago Tribune, and was a New York Times Critics Pick. It screened at more than 50 festivals worldwide, won 8 awards, including the Outfest Grand Jury Prizes for Outstanding US Feature and Outstanding Screenwriting. The film received rave reviews and appeared on several Best of the Year lists. His latest film Princess Cyd is easily the most underrated American film of the year, and Cone is being hailed as the next Jonathan Demme, with many critics naming Cyd on their top ten list. Cone teaches in the Department of Radio/TV/Film at Northwestern University.

 

length: 
96min
screens: 
Fri, 04/13/2018 - 10:00
Fri, 04/13/2018 - 19:30

A Silent Voice

In Japanese with English subtitles 

Shoko Nishimiya is a new transfer student, and the first deaf person Shoya Ishida has ever met. He immediately labels Shoko as a burden because of her disability. After being physically harmed by Shoya’s taunts, Shoko is moved to another school. Five years later, now a senior in high school, Shoya has lost whatever ‘popularity’ he may have gained from being a bully in elementary. As the only child to a single mother, Shoya now lives in severe shame of his past, caused by years of ostracization by his peers. Finding very little will to live, Shoya resolves to reconcile his missteps by attempting to reconnect with Shoko, believing he might one day be worthy of redemption in her eyes.

Winner of the top prize at the Japan Movie Critics Awards, and premiering in competition at the Annecy Film Festival in France, A Silent Voice is a moving story of friendship, coming of age, and the transcendence of personal struggle. Koe no katachi (the Japanese title) is based on the acclaimed manga of the same name by Yoshitoki Oima. The literal meaning is “the shape of voice,” which reflects the film’s central theme of how communication and bonding can take many forms. Revealing the psychological impact of bullying — which scars the bully as much as the victim — Naoko Yamada (one of the few female anime directors in Japan) gifts us her third feature. This overwhelmingly beautiful look at forgiveness, acknowledgment of mistakes, and the complexity of growing up is narrated from the perspective of the bully. Yamada’s approach to anime has been called ‘experimental,’ and in many ways it is. Her work is that rare form of hand-drawn cinema which invites audiences into a personal, intricate and intensely realistic portrait of the human condition, daring us to empathize with the inexcusable behavior of a struggling teenager.

Recommended for ages 12+

Themes: guilt, anti-bullying, suicide, friendship, making amends, self-reflection, peer-pressure, coming of age, socioeconomic status and class distinction, regret

Content Advisory: A hearing aid is ripped out of place, causing a girl’s ears to bleed; students get into a physical altercation; two characters contemplate suicide.

Classification: PG - violence; theme of bullying

Note: This film screens as part of the  program for grades 8-12. 

Trailer

In partnership with:

 

DIRECTOR'S BIO: 

Naoko Yamada started her career in 2004 at Kyoto Animation studio and became a director in 2009 with her first film K-On!, which she adapted from a manga comic strip of he same name, and her film later received a TV adaptation. Her second big project was Tamako Market series in 2013. Her work has been awarded on several occasions, and her approach to animation has generated a cult following -- a rare feat considering the sheer amount of anime being produced. A Silent Voice, is her third feature animated film, and though it was made with a fraction of the budget of many of the major anime studios, it premiered at the Annecy Film Festival in France in 2017, and was nominated for some of the highest film awards in Japan. Yamada is one of the few women directing feature animation projects not only in Japan, but also in the entire world. She is part of this new generation of Japanese directors who are willing to take exceptional artistic risks and tell daring stories.

 

 

length: 
129min
screens: 
Thu, 04/12/2018 - 18:30
Fri, 04/13/2018 - 12:00
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